Author: reckonreview

  • How Should a Writer Be?: GOOD, HARD WORK

    By Nick Rees Gardner My love for working class literature goes back to my preteen years when, over the summer, I rode with my dad to mid-Ohio car dealerships where we’d repair car interiors and windshield chips. We walked the hot asphalt and sweated. I listened to my dad trade stories with smarmy dealers and […]

  • Drivin’ Purple

    Fiction by Ric Hoeben One thing about Friday’s come round, people could really, finally, and truly get to where they were looking forward to the catfish stew, the catfish regular, the greens plenty, and the piles of deviled crab.  Robanna’s had it all: three buffet islands, a dessert bar and tea sweetened and less sweetened.  […]

  • You Come Too

    A Review of James Calemine’s Ghostland America By Kristy Bell James Calemine’s Ghostland America (Snake Nation Press, 2022) ought to come with a warning label. I’ll confess I had to take it in chunks. Certainly not because it was boring or hard to read, but because it left me with a taste of rust and […]

  • Artful Academics: On Entering the Conversation

    By Brandy Renee McCann I sat in the front row and waved my arm. I just couldn’t wait to share my opinion in class discussions. Hardly had another student began expressing themselves when my arm shot up with a half-baked reply. I had something to say and I wanted to say it as soon as […]

  • A Glamorous Life

    Flash Fiction by Katy Goforth I was born old. My mama and daddy had been busy before me and stayed busy after me. I was number four of thirteen. Lucky in some ways. I got marked as Lettie. Number ten got left with Tibb. And, well, the last one just got saddled with the nickname […]

  • Darkness Breaks

    a review of Chris McGinley’s Coal Black: Stories Reviewed by Wiley Reiver The late great Barry Hannah liked to declare this about writing stories: “You get in, you get out.” I suppose that saying could be reasonably interpreted in more than one way, and sometimes I’ve wondered if Hannah himself could or would say what […]

  • Buried Nitrogen: The Tragedy of the Brussel Sprout

    by Sandra K. Barnidge It all went wrong because of the barbecue pit. Not because of the pit itself, a Texas-style brick barbecue built in the 1950s, but because of where the pit is located in my backyard: under the twin shades of a mature camellia and a scraggly dogwood. You see, the pit has […]

  • Part of the Business

    Fiction by Travis Cravey Tommy had been going over invoices for two hours. His computer was getting warm and the heat made Tommy’s little office hot. His desk was just piles of paper and a keyboard, save one picture taped to his monitor of Tommy’s sister Katy and her baby. The picture was old now, […]

  • Mother Road

    A Flash Fiction Collaboration with Process Notes By Amy Cipolla Barnes and Sara Hills Sally Any second now, Dad will turn the car around and drive back to the Gemini Giant where we left Mom on the side of the road. He’ll race down the highway, not caring about speed limits or police, knowing the […]

  • Two Innocents

    Fiction by Elizabeth Walztoni Casey Fried’s grandfather had often told her that she was one of God’s honest children. He never would explain what it meant, to be one, but said the fact she could not understand was proof of it. She still thought about it wherever she went. God’s honest child has clocked in […]